Taking Flight

_DSC9237

I am not generally a spontaneous photographer. At least not in the sense of photos that happen in less than 5 seconds of seeing something. I do tend to be spontaneous in the sense that I wander with little direct and rely on intuition frequently. But when I do spot something I tend to be patient and take my time figuring it out before photographing it. Sometimes this takes less than a minute; sometimes it takes more than several minutes. Part of this is because of the cameras I use – the Hasselblad, Nikon or the pinholes – but a big part of it because I like the semi-meditative approach of finding something and then dwelling on it a minute before recording my thoughts/experience by way of an image.

Darkest Dreaming

img052img053img056

Stand together and let our art tell stories that last the ages. Now more than ever, hopefully we can find peace and a way to be effective in provoking positive human change. We as a global society will fall or stand together!

Conspiracy

Murial

Conspiracy theorism is a form of mental pathology. It’s attractive to gullible or malevolent minds because it enables, among other things, scapegoating, absorption in mystery and a sense of being superior, each of which is attractive, depending on the personality of the individual.

It also fosters a sense of victimhood, always popular with bullies. But conspiracy theories depend on suspension of critical faculty. The theory believer is too attached to the glamour of the theory, and its benefits, to deploy critical faculty. Some people, overwhelmed by the world, find reassurance in them, some kind of temporary mental/emotional comfort and “explanation”.

In fact, the theory believer willingly distorts their critical faculties to accept only selective information, fastened on with great zeal, and reject anything that detracts from or disproves the theory. Conspiracy theories also depend on arrogance on the part of the believer.

The great religions & mystery traditions teach that all things work together for good, however crazy they seem, and that from enlightened perspective, everything makes sense. Poetry & art are rich with evocations of this understanding and we’ve all been touched by it at moments.

The modern conspiracy theory fashion is a murky shadow of a shadow of a shadow of a shadow of this eternal truth, warped and distorted. May it serve to show us, ever more clearly, how to not be swayed by bullshit

Ausschnitt, Excerpt, Extracto, Extrait, Estratto

I awoke today with a simple photographic task. Show a small excerpt of my morning during Lockdown. So I thought I would turn to the subjects I know I always can when in need of photographs.  I enjoy reminding myself that the expectations I have of what images I’ll make prior to picking up the camera versus what images I find once I start shooting can be two very different things. You never know exactly what you will find and often the best thing you can do is just let chance set you up for the rest.

12345678910111213141516171819202122232425

 

Stay Safe, Stay Strong. I will see you on the other side.

I Think

img014-7

I think a lot. Sometimes I think too much. This is the thought I generally have at about 1am when I am wrestling with busy brain syndrome and cannot fall asleep. Here are a couple of thoughts kicking around in my head at this nightly hour.

What one sentence would you pass on in the event of a cataclysm that contained the most information with the fewest words, what would I say? Or what image of mine would I single out?”

“Is creating art a response to our own knowledge of our mortality?”

“If time is a human construct, how would we abandoning it and how would that change the way we lived?”

“I wonder what the post will bring tomorrow.”

And the list goes on.

This is a very long-winded introduction to me saying that photography is where I try to think the least. I try not to put thought into my images but rather try to put my feelings or emotions into them. Put another way, I try to make images based on what I am feeling rather than what I am thinking. I don’t know if this is to give my brain a rest or to give me a rest from my brain. A bit of both I would guess.

For the most part this works really well for me. I have become good at disengaging from my thoughts while I am out photographing.  I don’t like listening to music while I photograph either because it affects how I feel, which then affects how I photograph. For me it is enough to be there in a moment responding to subtle currents within me that I will struggle with later to put a finger on.

In fact, this is where my problems usually arise: when I try to think about my photos after the fact and figure them out. Generally I don’t do this too much. The photos are not products of thought, but rather visual translations of moods or feelings passing through me in a particular place or at some particular time. Thought doesn’t typically enter into that equation and therefore makes for an awkward fit I have found when forcibly injected into it later.

Anyhow, even now I am applying more thought to this image than I should, but sometimes I find the thinking “out load” to be an effective means of getting it out of my head.

That and I do like doing the writing just for the practice.

So don’t fret if you cannot explain your photos, or if you worry about the perceived lack of thought in them. Some photos are meant to embody a great deal of thought, but not all images. It is ok to make images that cannot be so intellectually described or explained. It is ok to make images on hunches, feelings, intuition, or the like. And it is ok to not understand your own images after you have made them. In fact, I rather enjoy it at times – the mystery of it all.

So here you go. Hopefully nothing I said gets you to thinking too much and keeps you awake tonight.