A Place To Feel

FEEL

Photography to me is an emotional endeavour. I am a pretty rational, analytical and logical person, or at least I try to be.

I do love to think and analyse things, situations and people. It is not that I am unemotional; I just value analytical and rational thought in such times over emotional thought.

FEEL2

But that changes when I get out into the world with a camera. As I said above, photography is an emotional activity for me. I try to photograph based on feeling rather than reason, emotions as opposed to logic. Sure, some analysis is necessary, I still meter and do the requisite math to calculate the long exposures I am fond of, but I get that work done as quickly as I can and it is only a means to an end. I don’t aim to make photos that represent technical achievement or superb rational execution. I like to try to make photos that reflect how I felt in a certain moment and that usually involves photos that contain some sense of the wonder I see and feel about the world when I am out in it as a photographer.

FEEL1

Perhaps that is why I have taken so well to pinhole and the old world photography processes. These types of photography are less about analysis than they are about intuition; they are less about documentation than they are about a slightly ethereal memory of being somewhere. It is then easy to dream, and dreams tend to be driven by emotion.

FEL3

Anyway, the idea for this reflection came about due to a thought I was having regarding the difference between looking at the situation rationally versus emotionally. I was leaning towards the rational perspective, unsurprisingly. Then I sit down at the computer and start editing and looking at images and realised that they showed a very different version of me looking at the world and I found that interesting.

http://www.berndkugow.photos/

A Dream Within A Dream

AD

I am plagued by sleeplessness, and usually drift off sometime between midnight and 1 am. Lucky for me, my body is used to this by now and I woke as usual at about 6. None of this is terribly important info, it is just providing a bit of context for I awoke from a dream; and dreams that get interrupted by waking always seem to stick with me a bit more clearly. Generally I have weird dreams that make me look dubiously at myself when I actually remember them. This morning’s dreams weren’t so weird. I was having a dream about being in a conversation with someone regarding why I use film. I know, I know, maybe I think about film photography so much that it permeates my dreams. But it was actually kind of refreshing to awake with a whole series of explanations laid out in mind. Or at least it was refreshing that that was what I woke to. There are many worse things for one to wake up thinking about right now.

AD5

I have answered this in a lot of different ways. I generally preface it by saying it is a longer, more complex answer than people might be expecting. Perhaps they would be better off continuing the conversation in a dream. Ha. But it is something I think about and I am constantly trying to refine my answer to adequately convey. I witness friends and strangers alike making countless photos with their phone. Instantly created, instantly posted, and instantly forgotten. I do not own a phone camera, and I cannot feel any emotional connection to a phone itself. If I did I think I would be repelled by the notion.

AD1

But let me explain some of the reasons I generally hold or give out. The first is that I love the cameras. My Hasselblad, my Nikon, my Leica, my pinholes, my Rolleiflex. I seem to create much more of a connection with these pieces of machinery than I do with any of my digital equipment. But my Rolleiflex is something else. I often introduce the camera as being the same age as I am (it was made in 1961) and it will live just as long as I will, if not even perhaps longer. Knowing it won’t be made obsolete by new technology (it has already faced that distinction) and replaced in a few short years helps. But it is more than this. I like the mechanical nature of my film cameras. I like that they don’t have a library of menus that present a solution to every problem I might face. I like that they don’t show me immediately whether my guesses and calculations were right or wrong. Nah, they are true companions, they listen to me, they share my vision, they chip in with their perspectives but it is an easy-going partnership. It is hard to explain, really. I think using a film camera like a pinhole or a Hasselblad or a Leica is something you cannot really understand till you have tried it. There are tactile qualities that just cannot be expressed. There is a change in perspective that escapes a verbal or written explanation.

AD3

And speaking of tactile, I really value producing tangible results. Negatives I can hold in my hand. True, I scan all my photographs into a digital format, but I always keep the file of negatives. If you told me that a member of my family might someday show their grandchildren the pages of negatives that these images reside on, I wouldn’t be all that surprised. But if you told me that one day they would show them the digital file of this image, I would be surprised. Is it honestly reasonable to expect the generations that come after to maintain the digital archive I have created of my generation? How long will my hard drives last? And unless someone takes care to transfer them to new media they’re lost. And what happens when that person no longer cares to? And that is not counting the chances of computer failure. I don’t place much stock in the permanence of digital media, especially given the habits of the average photographer when it comes to backing up and printing their work, me included. And so my film is my best hope for future children to see the life I lived and the images of the world and their ancestors. I put a lot of stock in this. There is a reassuring quality to being able to hold a negative up to light and see the image frozen there in your hands.

AD2

And if I were to limit this to just three reasons, you know what the third would be? The cost. I use film because it costs me money. Some claim that digital is great because the photos are free (after you buy the camera, those lenses, a computer and an Adobe CC license, of course), that you can make as many photos as you want with no charge. And this is an advantage in its way, but so is the cost of film. I load up my Rolleiflex and each shot costs me somewhere between 50p and £1. The photos aren’t free at all but because they have a cost, I assign them more value. When something costs you, you care about it more as a resource. I think about each of those potential images a bit harder and more carefully. I make the shots count. And it makes me a better photographer for it. Sure, I move slower. I make fewer photos. I am more deliberate and disciplined. These are not bad things. I can take my DSLR and easily make 400 images, but how much do I value each of those images? Not much. The majority of them are disposable and when I am making them I treat them that way. I don’t really care about 95% of those photos. And as I said, there are times that they are advantageous. But when I carry my film camera I care about each photo I make much more. So using film teaches me to care about each image.

AD6

There are other reasons, but those I think are the big ones. I could talk about the aesthetics of film, particularly black and white film. I could talk about dynamic range. I could talk about the delayed gratification of it. These would all be good topics to discuss further. One thing I don’t think you will ever hear me talk about interestingly enough is quality. I don’t go down that long and murky path despite using medium format film. For me it is still too contentious an issue and one that too many spend too much time arguing about, does film make a better image than digital? As if it is all about sharpness, pixels and detail. It just isn’t that important to me.

AD4

So I am trying to use the computer and social media less, and just focus on real life and the people I love and my art. Of course I am not going to be fully off the grid, because as you can see I am publishing this post. At times my head feels like it is exploding with the amount of information we are forced to consume on a daily basis and how that information is so distorted there is almost no longer any tangible truth. I feel there is this blanket distortion on society/media and the way we gather our news and important information, and more and more of us are feeling lost and looking for new ways out of this distortion and back to the truth. Finding hope in places like the Forests or beneath the big Sky, finding hope in the land and in the water and in old books offering new ideas and most importantly in each other and love. And using good old fashioned film to capture this beautiful world of ours.

AD9

Well there you go, a glimpse into my head this morning from my first few moments of consciousness.

AD7

http://www.berndkugow.photos/

Amidst The Atmoscape

This memorable journey through the early morning Mediterranean mist, memorable for many reasons, just came to mind and I thought why not. So here it is.

DSC_4814

Atmosphere of course would have worked. As they are from the Greek words atmos (vapor) and sphaira (globe, ball, etc). But I didn’t care as much about the sphere part of it, for me it was all about the atmos. I had driven under this blanket of vapor, without even a peek of the sun for two hours. Then driving north-east along the coast and climbing up the Mountain range I found myself exiting through the top of that world and into the bottom of another, separated by only the flimsiest barriers of water vapor and elevation.

DSC_4798

At this spot, I had a foot in both places as the mists swirled across the Mediterranean Sea beneath, giving me the barest glimpses now and again before pushing up the mountains, caressing me with its gentle, cool breeze and the promise of a beautiful new day.

http://www.berndkugow.photos/

 

Less Is More

L1Home 

The more cameras and lenses I tried to use in the past, the less creative I was. Too much gear is too much complication, and stress. I fell into decision fatigue. I now make the best of what I have.

L6Holmfirth Easter 

The less we complain, the more gratitude we have. And the more patience we have. Don’t complain — just feel pity for the other person. The less we complain, the more happiness we will find in our lives.

L9Builth Wells 

The less you have, the more you have.

L11

Hobson Moor – Winter 

Why make photos or be a photographer? For me it is to experience the world in a more connected, conscious, and appreciative way.

We live in an insanely distracted society.

Now, is this a bad thing?

I think so.

If we’re distracted, we cannot savour living.

L7Robin Hoods Bay 

To me, love, joy, and life is all about sharing our day, sharing our philosophies of life, and empowering and uplifting one another. If we’re being distracted by random crap on Facebook, Phone or the Internet, we cannot be present with one another.

L8Hebden Bridge 

Now, I think photography is a good way to fight this distraction. Photography forces us to pay attention.

DSC_4928Palma 

Photography is an experience of looking at images, and feeling a sense of gratitude, awe, inspiration, or emotional change.

L2Home 

When I look at my photos, I feel a sense of gratitude for the past, and a sense of appreciativeness for the growth I’ve had in life thus so far.

L12Home 

Photography is an experience of interacting with the world differently.

L4Borth (Hinterland Location) 

It encourages me to wander, to explore, to look around, and talk to strangers. Photography encourages me to walk more, which is good for my physical and mental health.

L10Wales 

Photography is a creative and spiritual outlet. Instant paintings. Instant art. Making photos makes my spirit feel uplifted. Making photos helps me make social commentary and critique, which I hope changes the hearts and minds of others in a positive way.

img810Home by the Sea – Dungeness

Ultimately, I consider photography as a form of experiencing life in a much richer, vivid, and beautiful way.

L4Delamere Forest 

Photography is like salt, pepper, butter, and garlic for everyday living.

L3Susan

I love life, music,  photography, and you.

http://www.berndkugow.photos/

LVI

Reality Check – Obscurity Knocks

L1003754

Today has been my birthday and it was made special by the friends and family that remembered and made me feel special. Thank you to you all and especially my better half Susan who came up trumps in presenting me with an antique compass, which I will treasure and use. Since I am not digitized as of yet, I shall enjoy my analogue world and stem the digital tide a little longer.

On that note I also like to mention the three things I so very much enjoy in life. Photography, music and great food and a quality Brandy (OK OK, it’s four – sue me).

img180

Even though music and photography are different. In music you start with a note, you add another note and another and another, and you build something.

Whereas in photography you start with the world and then narrow it down to what you want to show.

Reality Check

So there you have it. The two opposite ends of the line, and I am a servant to both.

TO6

http://www.berndkugow.photos/